Police accountability bills fall short for some activists

Posted: Updated:
NEW YORK -

Two bills on police accountability passed by the City Council this week, but some activists who originally pushed for them say they aren't satisfied. 

Intro 541 of the Right to Know Act requires officers to clearly explain that searches are completely voluntary and only allows searches if consent is given. The second bill, Intro 182, requires officers to identify themselves, offer a business card and provide an explanation for police activity.

Activists have criticized Intro 182 for straying too far away from what they originally wanted. They say loopholes shield officers from the requirements in too many instances. 

"The vast majority of encounters are low-level encounters and street traffic stops," says Juan Aguirre, of Communities United for Police Reform. "New Yorkers aren't afforded the same opportunities to hold their police accountable."

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