MTA announces changes to reduce risk of falling hardware from subway tracks

Posted: Updated:

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has announced several new safety measures to help reduce the risk of falling hardware from the city's elevated subway tracks.

About 325,000 metal containers have been replaced citywide with newer and bigger baskets. This allows for more thorough inspections.

The new technology comes after several reported incidents where loose track parts fell to the street below, narrowly missing pedestrians for causing damage to people's cars.

The MTA estimates more than 2.4 million pieces of track equipment like wedges and bolts that can over time become loose or fall from the elevated tracks. The agency says they are doing everything they can to prevent that.

The city's transit system is also looking at netting and has set aside $200 million in the capital budget to secure the entire transit system. The MTA says, "We are accelerating the installation of different types of netting so we can learn what works best and what we want to push forward and expand further."

In addition to more rigorous track inspections which include video monitoring, the MTA is also looking to enhance its hardware with component parts that push together to prevent bolts and nuts from becoming loose.

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