City officials underscore importance of education in tackling hate

Posted: Updated:

Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza, First Lady Chirlane McCray and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams all came together Friday to demonstrate their commitment in helping students understand hate crimes and their impact.

A discussion was held at Franklin D. Rosevelt High School in southern Brooklyn. Officials say that although students learn about anti-Semitism in school, they want to make sure students know what a hate crime is and how hurtful those crimes can be.

The city's approach to the issue is stepping up police patrols—but also educating kids so they understand the awful damage these crimes can cause.

It comes as anti-Semitic hate crimes are on the rise following several attacks against Jews in New York, including the stabbing of a rabbi last week at a Hanukkah celebration in Rockland County.

The City Council is also pushing for curriculum to be established to teach the history of genocides, including the Holocaust.

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