CDC: Diabetes prevalent in minority communities; close to 1 million New Yorkers diagnosed

Close to 1 million New Yorkers are estimated to have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency says it’s a disease that’s prevalent in minority communities.

News 12 Staff

Apr 7, 2022, 12:19 AM

Updated 798 days ago

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Close to 1 million New Yorkers are estimated to have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency says it’s a disease that’s prevalent in minority communities.
April is National Minority Health Month.
Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar or glucose.
Diabetes was highest among Native Americans, Black Americans and Hispanics, followed by Asian Americans nationwide.
Dr. Guido Machiavello at St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx says there are many contributing factors to diabetes in minority communities access to healthy foods that are affordable, the rapid rate of obesity and simply not having time off to see their doctor.
"How is diabetes diagnosed? By a simple bloodwork. Doesn't require to be fasting for it - it's just one sample but it does require a medical visit,” said Dr. Machiavello.
Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes, which is the most prevalent, consists of insulin therapy and diet and exercise–which is key.
All of those daunting outcomes can be prevented. Although there is no cure for diabetes, complying with your treatment plan from your physician can keep it under control and manage the condition.


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