Chinese American planning council unveils mixed-use hub, affordable housing

With a vibrant ribbon-cutting ceremony, the Chinese American Planning Council officially opened the doors to its inaugural Manhattan home, ushering in a new era of community engagement and support.

Edric Robinson

Apr 12, 2024, 9:26 PM

Updated 40 days ago

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In a monumental development on the Lower East Side, the Chinese American Planning Council (CPC) introduced its latest endeavor, promising to reshape the neighborhood landscape.
The grand unveiling witnessed the inauguration of CPC One, marking a significant milestone for the organization.
With a vibrant ribbon-cutting ceremony, the Chinese American Planning Council officially opened the doors to its inaugural Manhattan home, ushering in a new era of community engagement and support.
“We’re really excited about opening CPC One. This project has been decades in the making for us to have a permanent home in our historical neighborhood of Chinatown,” said president and CEO of the CPC, Wayne Ho.
With a history spanning 59 years, CPC is renowned for its commitment to providing social services for Asian Americans. Co-founder Virginia Key emphasized the organization's mission, stating, “We believe that in helping new immigrants achieve the American dream, we are making this city, this state, this nation a better place.”
The new building on Suffolk Street will serve as the headquarters for over 50 programs, including its day care services, benefiting an estimated 15,000 community members.
“Community members of all backgrounds will be served here, making sure they can support their families, to putting food on their tables through public benefit enrollment to young people coming here for summer youth employment programs,” said Ho.
Spanning across the headquarters' main three floors, the space boasts classrooms, communal areas and even a kitchen funded by DoorDash. Additionally, the adjacent building on Norfolk Street offers over 200 units of affordable housing for seniors.
“We know there's a need for housing. Through the city’s lottery we received over 32,000 applications for 200 units of affordable housing,” said Ho.
Additionally, the project includes space for a cultural heritage center of the Beth Hamedrash Hagodol Synagogue destroyed in 2017.
CPC is advocating for additional affordable housing units throughout the boroughs, responding to the pressing demands of the community.


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