Community provides input on future of Soundview skatepark

The skatepark is expected to break down later this year, with an estimated two to three years for completion.

Heather Fordham

May 30, 2024, 2:21 AM

Updated 15 days ago

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A dilapidated and beaten down roller rink in Soundview Park will soon be filled with kickflips and ollies.
The first public input meeting was held at P.S.107 on Wednesday night. Council Member Amanda Farías organized the hands-on meeting alongside NYC Parks Department, Tony Hawk's nonprofit The Skatepark Project and pro-Skater Tyshawn Jones.
Skaters, aspiring skaters and the community weighed in by creating drawings, filling out surveys and using clay to make sculptures of what they would like to see at the skatepark.
"I would love to see something out of the ordinary, just something different from other skateparks so the Bronx can claim itself," said Kevin Ortiz, Soundview native and skater.
The $7 million project is fully funded by a citywide initiative to revitalize unused areas in the park and replace it with an outlet for kids and greenspaces.
"If you don't have a designated spot, you're technically not allowed to ride a skateboard on the sidewalk, so we want to create these safe spaces to use skateboards and properly learn how to skate," said Amanda Farias, council member.
The meeting also addressed noise concerns. According to the Parks Department, the closest residence would be 700 feet from the park.
"The materials that we use now are sound efficient and it's a big enough distance from residential areas," said Farias.
Tyshawn Jones is a pro-skater who grew up in Soundview. He says skateparks are few and far between in the Bronx.
"I did a lot of traveling to Manhattan and the different boroughs, so it's good to get something in the community now," said Jones.
Jones is working with the Skatepark Project to help build accessible skateparks in underserved neighborhoods.
"It's something that you could pick up and become successful with," said Jones.
The skatepark is expected to break down later this year, with an estimated two to three years for completion.


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