Doctor who saved MTA conductor’s life reflects on his training

Despite Dr. Patrick McGrory’s medical and military training, he says the first thing that came to his mind was what he learned – and now teaches – in the ‘Stop The Bleed’ course.

Shakti Denis and Adolfo Carrion

Mar 5, 2024, 11:26 PM

Updated 140 days ago

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The doctor who came to the rescue of an MTA train conductor who was slashed in the neck last week is raising awareness about the lifesaving training he says anyone can take.
Dr. Patrick McGrory was on his way home from a late shift at New York Presbyterian-Methodist Hospital, when his train was stopped at the Rockaway Avenue station. He heard screams from outside of the train.
The conductor got on the PA system, calling for help and informing riders that he had been stabbed.
Dr. McGrory rushed to the conductor cabin and found 59-year-old Alton Scott bleeding from a deep wound on his neck. He says that Scott, who has worked for the MTA for 24 years, told him that someone slashed him when he stuck his head out of the train.
“He had a clean face mask around his chin and I happen to have one too, I didn’t have anything else, so I rolled them up and I put it inside the wound and packed the wound, and then put pressure on it and stop the bleeding that way,” said McGrory.
Despite McGrory’s medical and military training, he says the first thing that came to his mind was what he learned – and now teaches – in the ‘Stop The Bleed’ course.
“When I was running towards that conductor car.. I was like how am I going to do this, and I’m like ‘Stop The Bleed’,” said McGrory. “It could be happening everywhere, here on the street, on the highway, construction sites… you got to be ready.
Scott is now on the road to recovery after receiving 34 stitches. Police are still searching for his attacker at this time.


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