‘It is a matter of first come first serve’: FDA authorizes drug used to treat lupus for COVID-19

The FDA has issued an emergency authorization of hydroxychloroquine, a drug that's commonly used to treat malaria, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis to treat COVID-19.

News 12 Staff

Mar 31, 2020, 1:32 AM

Updated 1,509 days ago

Share:

The FDA has issued an emergency authorization of hydroxychloroquine, a drug that's commonly used to treat malaria, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis to treat COVID-19. 
While many with the virus are now seeing a light at the end of the tunnel, others say they are seeing that light blown out. 
"They said that it is a matter of first come first serve," 41-year-old Monique Gore-Massy said was the response from her pharmacy weeks ago when she went to get her prescription for hydroxychloroquine filled. 
undefined
 
It's a drug that she says keeps her alive and out of the hospital -- as she's been fighting lupus for 10 years. A drug that she now says can't find anywhere. 
"I have had kidney failure and cardiac failure. I've dealt with neurological issues, I've dealt with mobility issues as well which left me bedridden for about three years so my journey from what you're seeing right now someone who is cognizant who can articulate on their own someone who could sit up on their own. This has been a hard-fought case,” said Gore-Massy. 
She says without this drug she's not sure how long her stability will last.
"There's no cure right now. We are using medications that have become a trial and error façade and once you get the perfect match you don't want to mess with that formula,” said Gore-Massy. 
Gore-Massy has been working closely with the Lupus Foundation of America, reaching out to state pharmacy boards, the federal government and more to ensure the availability of this life-saving drug for people living with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. 
She says while she understands the importance of finding medications to save those who have the coronavirus, she says it shouldn't come at the expense of her life and so many others. 
She tells News 12 she has about one week's supply left and that she's just remaining hopeful that her prescription refill will come through. 


More from News 12