City Council eliminates qualified immunity for officers in the NYPD

The City Council has issued a series of reforms requiring more transparency from the NYPD.
One of the biggest changes is the elimination of qualified immunity.
Qualified immunity previously protected officers against civil lawsuits.
Citizens can now sue individual officers for using excessive force or unreasonable search and seizure.
The NYPD will also be required to issue quarterly reports on all vehicle stops. 
This will include information on race, precinct and the age of the driver.
Major crashes involving significant injury will now be investigated by a new unit within the Department of Transportation and a civilian complaint review board will have the power to investigate bias-based policing and racial profiling complaints made by the public.
Mayor Bill de Blasio approves of the changes, saying the reforms will: “Confront centuries of over policing in communities of color and strengthen the bonds between police and community.”
In June, Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order for each local government in New York to create a plan to reform and reinvent their police force.
New York City’s plan lays out five goals, including: the decriminalization of poverty, recognition and continual examination of historical and modern-day racialized policing in New York City, transparency and accountability to the people of New York City, community representation and partnership and a diverse, resilient and supported NYPD.
The mayor says all initiatives will be launched in 2021 with a tracker to monitor their progress being released on May 1.
PBA President Patrick Lynch responded to the changes, saying in part: “New Yorkers are getting shot and police officers are out on the street. Where are these City Council members? Safe at home, hiding behind their screens and dreaming up new ways to give criminals a free pass.”